Coach Update

Posted: January 11th, 2017 | Author: | Filed under: Philadelphia Eagles | 213 Comments »

Nothing official yet, but…

We’ll see what happens.

One interesting note about Lal.

Sure enough, Lal is a client there. Is Bob LaMonte, Howie’s agent, pushing Lal on the Eagles? That’s a fair question to ask.

At the same time, it isn’t like Lal is unqualified or anything like that. He has been an assistant in the NFL for 10 seasons. He’s worked for different teams, coaches and GMs. Relationships aside, I would have no problem with the Eagles hiring Lal.

Some have talked about Jags WR coach Jerry Sullivan. He has been a terrific assistant for a long time, but apparently is considering retiring. He will turn 73 this summer.

*****

The Eagles added WR Dom Williams from the Chargers practice squad.

Williams spent his rookie year on the Chargers’ practice squad after leading the team with 10 catches for 132 yards in the preseason. He signed with San Diego as a rookie free agent following the 2016 NFL Draft. The 6-2, 200-pound Williams was named All-Pac-12 honorable mention after his senior season at Washington State in 2015. He had 75 catches for 1,040 yards and 11 touchdowns in his final year with the Cougars. He finished his Washington State career ranked second all time in school history in receiving yards (2,889), second in touchdown catches (30) and third in receptions (192).

Williams played for Mike Leach at WSU. Over the years, Leach has done a good job of developing WRs with good hands. Williams isn’t dynamic, but he is a hands catcher and can make tough grabs. He has solid size and a year of NFL practice under his belt. Good competition for Training Camp.

*****

Sean McDermott is now the head coach in Buffalo.

McDermott had a great run with the Eagles before being let go after the 2010 season. Andy Reid wanted a change in the defense, but also knew McDermott needed a change of scenery. He didn’t handle the transition from assistant to defensive coordinator well. I’m not talking about X’s and O’s, but rather how he treated people. McDermott tried to assert himself into the new role and rubbed a few people the wrong way. He wasn’t a bad guy. He simply needed a change of scenery.

McDermott did a very good job with the Panthers and now gets a chance to show he is ready to run his own team. He certainly has the knowledge and experience from working under great coaches. It will be interesting to see how his leadership skills have improved and if he learned from the past.

Good luck to him.

_


  • Greg Tulino

    Good for Sean. Wish him well. On a side note the Chargers are moving to LA. What a joke. No way 2 NFL teams can flourish in that Market. The stadiums will be half empty in all likelihood. Fans will arrive late in the first quarter and leave early in the 4th quarter to avoid the awesome traffic.

    • Insomniac

      LA isn’t a football city that’s for sure. It’s like the city is begging for more traffic for some reason.

      • Sean Stott

        Can’t get any worse.

      • Will Ft. Daft Punk

        Not if the NFL is going to give them 5’11” teams every year.

        LA would have supported the Raiders better than the Chargers and Rams combined

      • bdbd20

        No, but it’s a rich city. Team might be a flop, but the value of the franchise will surely increase.

        • bill

          Then again, so is San Diego.

      • Didyouseethesizeofthemchickens

        L.A. is a football city, as long as it’s USC or UCLA football. But i agree the NFL doesn’t seem to work in L.A,

    • anon

      Chargers probably saw how crappy the Rams are figured they could compete to be top dog.

      • Julescat

        crap team versus crap team?

    • Sean Stott

      In all sincerity, Philly fans are the absolute worst about leaving games early.

      Also, I think Spanos did this because he realized he needs a new stadium, doesn’t want to fund it on his own, because SD wants no part of it, and instead will just go to the stadium already being built as a cheaper option. Really sleazy play, and people in LA already don’t give a shit about the NFL. I think the league’s popularity is waning as it is, and this will be looked at as a bad move in 10 years time.

      • Fufina

        Honestly the league and the owner could finance this easily themselves. There is no need to spend $1.5+ Billion to build a stadium. You can build a modern quality 60k-70k stadium for half that cost if you are not obsessed with building some kind of monument to your own ego, or the need to 1 up every stadium built before.

        Any lack of fan engagement is due to the fact that they run a mom and pop organisation that has struggled to invest in developing their brand or team and overpricing their experience, not the lack of a $100mil exec suit complex.

        • anon

          it’s the fact that ticket prices are close to 100 bucks a game for shitty seats for teams that never make the playoffs — looking at you lurie.

      • Julescat

        Goodell is ruining the NFL. He’s letting the owners act as carpetbaggers. The players act like gangster thugs. Goodell just sits there and watches while the ratings plummet.

        • Fufina

          Honestly no city should have 2 NFL teams – makes no sense honestly. They should have just moved the raiders down to LA and forced everyone else to stand pat and actually invest in growing their team and franchise by actually putting a competent product on the field rather than just throwing out their toys and demanding public money or they will run off to a LA that failed to support 2 teams in the past.

          • teltschikfakeout88

            I disagree that it makes no sense…LA has the financial demographics to support 2 teams…One is an AFC and the other is an NFC team…I think it does not work because the fans just are not that into NFL football…however it definitely works in NY….

          • Bert’s Bells

            Let’s see LA support one team first. You may be right.

          • anon

            new yorkers love football, and those teams serve, ny, nj and parts of conn; though pats fandom stretches pretty far in the NE.

          • Will Ft. Daft Punk

            LA markets wont support a losing team that isnt named the Lakers. Raiders had the best shot to make it there

          • anon

            Raiders should stay in oakland. LA of all places doens’t need a team. Lots of teams have been there and left.

          • Will Ft. Daft Punk

            Their stadium is falling apart. They tried to stay but it wasnt working out.

            I think the Warriors are also planning to move out of Oakland and into SF.

          • Fufina

            Not sure they Bay Area is a two team area but i guess with the money around there these days they could support anything.

          • Sean Stott

            Just like Lakers fans fled to the Clippers, 49ers fans will start to cheer for the Raiders. Funny how winning does that.

      • Ark87

        I’m just glad the city of San Diego made a stand. Tax-payers buying stadiums for an extremely wealthy organization like the NFL is crap. Football is not a public service. It is a for-profit organization, they don’t need tax money to float their bottom line (into the stratosphere).

        The sooner it becomes normalized that no city will build stadiums for a professional team (unless the city owns said team), the better.

        • Gary Barnes

          Amen

        • teltschikfakeout88

          But the stadiums are not being used for NFL only…they will get bowl games, concerts…the transient traveler revenue will get pumped into Disney or even small businesses etc. where the transactional taxes will get a bump etc. There are plenty of scenarios where government in dipping into the private sector to make money…this is no different…SD ran the numbers and said..not seeing it that way…in fact they probably see it as good fortune that the OC is paying for this and all that transient travel will be going an hour down the 5 south to stay in SD and spend money in their city…I think it is a case by case process as to whether it is good business for local governments get involved in funding an NFL stadium….but it can’t be an NFL only stadium..

          • RobNE

            I think studies have shown on a case by case basis, it’s always a net loser for the city.

          • teltschikfakeout88

            just like they have shown that networks that broadcast the NFL is a net loser as well..there is GW to the city that has NFL just like there is goodwill for the various networks that broadcast the bulk of the NFL games (Fox and CBS)….and yet cities are lining up to swing their dicks and say look at what I got to offer as entertainment…not 1 but 2 nfl teams…

          • Stephen E.

            If the stadiums get revenue by other means, than that just makes it even more obvious that teams should finance them on their own. Sounds like a sound business decision.

          • teltschikfakeout88

            not really…owning real estate is a pain…the NFL is an entertainment business and is trying to grow their value through the value of its intellectual property…the NFL shield branding etc…owning real estate for other revenue streams not really related to NFL football is probably not a the best idea…although the Cowboys and Skins seem to be doing alright with it…but I would say that for most owners they should leave the ownership of stadiums to real estate owners…

          • Ark87

            This is lazy of me, but I find they do pretty good comprehensive research and present it in an entertaining manner.
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcwJt4bcnXs

      • Stephen E.

        If this team actually won games, people wouldn’t leave early.

        Of course you see lots of people leaving early. There were 9 games where you could have left early and missed nothing.

    • Will Ft. Daft Punk

      Raider fans > Charger fans + Rams Fans

    • Mac

      I hear it’s really easy to find parking in LA. All you have to do is pull out of your driveway.

    • D3FB

      Hahaha well they are going to play in the fucking StubHub Center for two years. 27,000 capacity. That’s going to be wild.

      • laeagle

        That’s about as much as they could fill, I’d guess.

    • laeagle

      I feel terrible for San Diego fans. That’s a fun city that deserves a team. I support them not giving in to the NFL stadium blackmail, but the flip side is that a new stadium would most definitely generate revenue for them. They’re kind of a great market for a middle of the road team like the Chargers.

      As for LA, this city can barely support the Rams as is. Sure, there’s Ram’s paraphernalia in the Super Market, but no one really cares outside of the novelty. It might be different if they were winning but I don’t think you can look at that organization and expect that to happen anytime soon. Nor could you expect it out of a team like the Chargers, who didn’t even know where the hell they wanted to put their team until the last minute.

      The only native Angelenos I know are USC fans first, with some Raiders fans thrown in. Though I was against the Raiders moving here because they fit so well in Oakland. Shame that they’re moving now, too. And why in the sweet fuck does a team make sense in Las Vegas?

      I, of course, care about the Rams because it looks like the Eagles are playing here next year and I get to go to the game!

      • RobNE

        I really have no sympathy for owners in these situations. You don’t need another billion dollars. You could build a stadium with a longer payoff (due to more debt). If you choose not to, ok, but don’t whine that life is unfair somehow.

        • ChoTime

          But why should a billionaire accumulate unearned rental income on his money at a lower rate than some other unearned rental income? A billionaire should be allowed to add to his hoard in any way he wants and never suffer criticism. If we as citizens don’t want to bankroll and enable his multiplying his hoard at our expense, then he has every moral right to invest in fracking or BP or surveillance devices. I mean, he gots to make a living don’t he? Feed the kids and all that.

  • SteveH

    Should be interesting to see how Sean handles a team like Buffalo, you know the kind of perennial loser coming off of a dysfunctional coaching staff and generally just being owned by the Patriots year in and year out.

    Not the easiest gig, wish him luck.

    • Fufina

      I would make sure i was anywhere but the AFC East as a coach. Tough to have any sustained success (only way to keep your job) in a division with Bill and Tom. Could produce a top 4 AFC team and still never win a division title.

      • Bert’s Bells

        For all the complaints about Rex Ryan, he regularly put together plans and teams that could take the Patriots one on one. Job number one for an NFL coach -beat the teams in your division.

      • anon

        Miami made the playoffs, Patriots are not unbeatable. Bills are a good team if they can fix the defense.

      • laeagle

        Now is as good a time as any to get something started in the AFC East. Brady won’t be around much longer, unless he has the most incredible luck imaginable.

        • ChoTime

          Which he seems to.

        • RobNE

          I really think he might have 3 more years. Which is a lot. My bet is he thinks he has 4.

          • Stephen E.

            We’re going to see him tarnish his legacy a bit by playing one year too long, for sure. His ego demands it.

  • GermanEagle
  • bill

    Geez. Even Tommy is trolling Media Mike now.

  • Call Me Carlos the Dwarf

    Awesome. I like Sean, and hope this job works out well for him.

  • Bert’s Bells

    As long as LaMonte isn’t pushing Ruben Amaro, Jr for the WR coaching gig.

  • P_P_K
    • unhinged

      A friend who is a Jags fan told me Coughlin will have a high (VP) position in Jags FO. He’ll be over the GM, so I guess we’ll find out if he’s sold on Bortles or not.

    • laeagle

      Coughlin is VP, Marrone is coach. And apparently there are already disputes about coaching hires…

      • RobNE

        I thought Banner nailed this on Bradnt’s podcast, which I really enjoyed. It’s the HC’s hires. You can give input, but they are the HC’s hires.

  • Koy: The Legend of Neckbeard

    Eeeesh. Birds 24/7 shut down for good today. Did that commenter revolt (which I never quite understood) kill it? It’s a shame that a blogger-to-professional reporter success stories like Brandon Lee Gowton are becoming so rare, and in this case, fleeting.

    http://www.philly.com/philly/business/Philadelphia-Magazine-announces-layoffs-shuts-down-popular-Eagles-section-of-website.html

    • D3FB

      PhillyMag is shedding a ton of staff right now. Unrelated to quality of work or community, more (inept leadership) business dynamics.

      • Tumtum

        A lot of media organizations are shedding salaries right now.

        • ACViking

          Apparently, on the national political beat, too . . .

          As evidenced by the dreadful coverage we’ve been getting since mid-2015.

          • Dave

            The Washington Post and New York Times are profitable and keep increasing their staff. Unfortunately, local and regional media, outside of the major TV affiliates, are a dying breed.

            “most of the stories they cover each week can normally be cited to others done by print media organizations and showed how TV news also β€œrepackages” work done by print sources”

            http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv/john-oliver-predicts-tv-news-newspapers-article-1.2742664

            BTW, If you have Amazon Prime, you can get the Post for 6 month free then it becomes $3.99/month

            http://www.politico.com/media/story/2016/12/the-profitable-washington-post-adding-more-than-five-dozen-journalists-004900

          • Sean Stott

            No, the NYTimes is Failing Bigly

          • ACViking

            even if the NYT is making money, the political beat — led by Dean Banquet — is a nuclear waste dump.

          • anon

            Not sure whether the journalism is a representation of the politicians or vice versa.

            Think the underlying problem is that our media, like our internet is funded by ad dollars — as consumers we get what we pay for.

          • ChoTime

            Most of the big problems are due to Money.

          • unhinged

            Bezos cut a huge deal with the CIA to put their archives on the cloud in 2010. That was before he bought the Washington Post, and since then that paper is a lap dog for USG and all intelligence propaganda. The NYT is almost as pathetic. They peddle the neo-conservative, U.S. exceptionalism, war hawk perspective, and the only alternative to their garbage is the alternative media.

          • Koy: The Legend of Neckbeard

            lol ok

          • RobNE

            I don’t think the Post is planning to be a lap dog for the new administration, they are hiring their own Spotlight type political group of reporters.

          • unhinged

            That makes sense. President-Elect ME! is anathema to the neocons. That is the only thing about him that I can stomach. He’s towing a very dangerous line alienating a very politicized national security/intelligence community. They will pull out all the stops to crucify him, I expect. And of course our mainstream media will aid and abet in every possible manner.

          • John Galt
          • Tumtum

            Presidential candidates didn’t spend on advertising for this election cycle, and that money was counted on by News orgs. Lots of good people lost their jobs in the past week.

          • BobSmith77

            They spent HUGE dollars but it still largely went to TV stations in select markets. Clinton raised $1.4B and Trump $932M and most of it was spent.

            In the ’20 election, candidates really have a $1B benchmark in funding to raise. In really competitive senate races, it is $50M per candidate.

            Local TV affiliates in certain states including in PA had all-time quarterly earnings records because of the Presidential election.

          • anon

            Yup

          • Tumtum

            Guess my company is laying people off nation as an atta boy for busying our asses through the election that made lots of money.

          • ChoTime

            Why spend when you can spout off a cheap shot, get every media outlet covering you for free, and have half the country love you for it?

          • Tumtum

            I don’t blame the tactic at all. Very smart business plan. We gave so much free air time it is hard to blame anyone. Suppose I should just be happy that I am useful enough not to have to worry about lay-offs, right?

          • RobNE

            only going to get worse, they don’t know what to do.

      • Gary Barnes

        Agreed. I know several people who had worked at PhillyMag and left because it was so poorly run and had such low standards.

      • Fufina

        Print and online news media is brutal at the moment ad revenue is down ~20% on the year. People won’t buy or subscribe for content. Market will see a lot of consolidation over the next 2-3 years and we are going to be left with 3-4 big national outfits doing quality journalism, a few ’boutique’ news outlets like Vox, and after that a wasteland of click bait spam content of absolutely no value trying to hoover up nickles on a shoe string budget.

        • anon

          Structural question of whether ad revenue is the “best” way to support the internet, since the point of a business is to be an efficient money-maker.

          But no one wants to pay for anything on the internet so….

      • teltschikfakeout88

        Nahh..its al part of president elect trump to work over the media…

    • ChoTime

      A shame. I liked that site quite a bit before, and found the commentariat revolt pretty pissy.

    • meteorologist

      I don’t understand why people don’t understand the revolt. The content on the site wasn’t as good/enjoyable anymore. I didn’t understand it at first but it became clear after I stopped reading every article daily there.

      However, I’m hearing that the clicks were still there/this wasn’t why they closed up

      • anon

        I personally didn’t think it was that much different although I don’t think hiring BLG was the right move – i liked BGN for what it was, but 24/7 was something different.

      • laeagle

        It wasn’t that people moved. That sort of thing happens all the time. People have moved through here, BGN, and 24/7 all the time. To each their own. What people like me have a hard time understanding is why it was a “revolt” and turned into some big thing. You don’t like the site, who cares, go somewhere else. You don’t have to shit all over everyone else.

        • meteorologist

          It’s a community and BLG didn’t exactly endear himself to a few of the well known members in their interactions in the comments sections.

          And for a lot of people the comments were most of the reason for going to the site; once it went south it was a feedback loop- fewer comments, less interest, fewer comments, less interest

  • A Roy

    The problem, IMHO, is that many of the malcontents and trolls that were on 24/7 will migrate here. While the 2 Math Grads that are Brilliantly Disrupting the Auto Insurname Industry might get a few more clicks, I’ll have to slog through more BS to get to AC Viking, D3FB, and others insightful comments.

    • Bert’s Bells

      I may be a malcontent but I’m no troll!

    • Mac

      They’ll find a home over at Philly Voice.

    • BobSmith77

      Just block the user and their comments don’t appear in full length.

    • laeagle

      It was like “Lord of the Flies” except the island was run by Piggy. It’s all over at Jimmy’s site, so I think you won’t have to worry.

      It’s such a shame on that whole “incident”. There were some good guys over there, but the way that whole thing turned on Josh and Brandon was just pathetic. Way too many people thinking they were way too impactful, and just acting like spoiled children while sniping at Josh and Brandon.

  • BobSmith77

    http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/sports/eagles/Eagles-WR-Nelson-Agholor-reflects-on-forgettable-second-season.html

    If there was ever a player that needed to see a sports psychologist this offseason, it is Agholor for stress reduction and focus especially during games.

    I know a number of teams in MLB now employ them on staff but what about NFL teams.

    • Dave

      It is my understanding that the Eagles have at least one on staff. Can’t remember where I read it, but it was in reference to Ags from a month or so ago.

    • RobNE

      better than his own prior attempted methods at stress reduction.

    • anon

      He said he’s going to work on his mental approach to the game.

    • Stephen E.

      Agholor has had a case of the yips since, oh, game 2.

  • BobSmith77

    16 possible Super Bowl matchups ranked.

    http://www.sportsonearth.com/article/213274922/super-bowl-matchups-2017?partnerId=ed-11097603-658620023

    I’d personally like to see Pats vs. Packers.

    • anon

      What are the other NFC options, Packers, Cowboys, SEA, ATL – i guess i don’t like any NFC teams; usually hate the falcons but like them this season – hopefully they don’t choke like usual. AFC, i like the steelers, not sure how the chiefs keep winning games.

      • Bert’s Bells

        Packers-Chiefs would be the two for me. Wouldn’t care if the Seahawks or Steelers won either. My freshman year roommate is a Pittsburgh guy and he’s a good dude.

        • daveH

          Ask him what the 33 means for Rollng Rock .. the real reason

  • Insomniac

    https://twitter.com/Eagles/status/819632278037000193?s=09

    We signed a FB, are we going to do some power running? Just so happens that he played with Wentz too.

    • Koy: The Legend of Neckbeard

      Was on the practice squad back in September.

    • teltschikfakeout88

      has more of a body type like a TE at 6’3″…yeah he was a signed UDFA that was on the practice squad…

    • Tumtum

      Andy still has one today. You know i never laid attention if Burton lined up there. Did he?

      • Insomniac

        I don’t think he did. I only remember Beau lining up as a lead blocker most of the time.

  • Gian GEAGLE

    Wildcard round of the playoffs was terrible. Hopefully this weekends games are much better

    • John Galt

      Who are you and what have you done with Gian GEAGLE? This post isn’t even 1/10th as long as his minimum post length. Don’t try to fool us into thinking you are him – HACKER!

      • ChoTime

        Chip killed that guy.

    • Bob Brewer

      As long as Dallas loses it’s a good weekend.

      • Ryan Rambo

        GRRRRRRREAAAAAAAAAT!!!

  • Insomniac

    Zay Jones (WR) vs Brandon Facyson (CB). Both guys could be picked on day 2.

    http://giphy.com/gifs/elxRPR4zCUg00

  • Ryan Rambo

    NBC Washington reports Wade Phillips will interview for the Redskins’ defensive coordinator vacancy on Friday.
    The growing narrative had been that Phillips would be joining ex-Redskins OC Sean McVay in Los Angeles, but instead he’s talking with McVay’s old team. Phillips would be a huge get for a Redskins defense that underachieved in 2016, and placed too much pressure on the offense.

    • anon

      Wade Phillips > Jim Schwartz?

      • Ryan Rambo

        Probably lol

    • Greg Richards

      Schefter just reported that Phillips to Rams is done deal. Thank god the Redskins didn’t get him.

      • Ryan Rambo

        Yaaaaas!

      • Anders

        The Rams might actual be good on defense next year

  • A_T_G
    • Corry

      I have to admit, of all the coaching hires they could have gone with, Wade Phillips would have had me the most concerned.

      And if I’m being honest, I wish he was available when Pederson was putting together his staff. I think he’s considerably better than Gym Shorts.

      • scratcherk

        He runs a 3-4 tho.

        • Anders

          He runs a 3-4 1 gap which looks awful like a 4-3 under

          Think JJ’s okie package with Jevon Kearsen standing up as a joker and you have Wade Phillips defense

          • Sb2bowl

            Pretty much- LA or St Louis or whatever they are this week has some exciting pieces to work with on that side of the ball; glad he chose them, even though we get to play out there twice this year.

            Anyone else worried about the length of travel for our away games this year?

          • John Galt

            Yep, having it line up where we play the AFC west and NFC west in the same year makes it tough. I live in SoCal though, so at least I get to go to 2 games this year without having to make my annual pilgrimage back to Philly.

        • Corry

          What Anders said. It’s not your tradiional 2 gap 3-4.

  • Dave

    Reading up on the Rams hiring of 30 year old Sean McVay as head coach, I shake my head in disbelief. Maybe he’ll turn out to be a good head coach, but I can’t help but wonder how a billion dollar organization can put their football team in the hands of someone so young and inexperienced. For comparison:

    Lane Kiffin, 31, Oakland Raiders – 2 years
    Raheem Morris, 32, Tampa Bay Buccaneers – 3 years
    Josh McDaniels, Denver Broncos, 32, 3 years
    Jon Gruden, 34, Oakland Raiders – 4 – years
    Bill Cowher, 34, Pittsburgh Steelers – 14 years
    Mike Tomlin, 34, Pittsburgh Steelers – 9 years
    Eric Mangini, 34, New York Jets – 3 years

    The success stories:

    Gruden was the OC here under Ray Rhodes, a defensive coach. Gruden ran his own offensive system for 2 season before becoming head coach.

    Cowher stepped into a good situation in Pittsburgh with a great defense and great ownership.

    I don’t know if any young coach will ever get as lucky as Tomlin again, stepping into a situation of having a young franchise quarterback and great ownership.

    The failures:

    Kiffin was/is an immature head case.

    McDaniels traded Cutler and drafted Tebow in the first round to be the franchise QB. By all accounts he was also immature.

    Morris was saddled with Mark Dominik as his GM. The lack of talent and injuries greatly contributed to Raheem’s demise.

    As for Mangini, the whole spygate saga showcased Mangini’s immature nature.

    McVay inherits a young, talented QB. But with Les Snead as GM, lack of a first and third round pick, he already has one hand tied behind his back.

    • Rellihcs

      Do you think that that billion dollar organization’s financial success depends on the football success of the team? I would argue that that’s not necessarily true. Also, I would argue that that team is looking for the long-haul with a young nucleus (if they even have one) and can invest in the young coach and give him years to develop.

      I think you’re thinking short-term, and with all due respect, with an ageist lens that is reductionist. I do not think that that franchise is focused on the short term. New (old) city, new QB… in the same division as Seattle… Just doesn’t seem like “win-now” is remotely important – developing for the future is.

      • Dave

        “ageist lens that is reductionist” I couldn’t disagree more.

        • Rellihcs

          So Zuckerberg is a bad CEO, Theo Epstein is a bad GM?

          I’m not saying that I know much about the guy – in fact I will say that I don’t – but it seems to me like you are basing a lot of assumptions – confidently – off of only 1 factor – age. Which to me is the definition of ageism.

          • Dave

            Ageism. Ugh! You put me in a box because I don’t think a 30 year old coach has enough actual experience.

          • anon

            Ironically he might have as much or more NFL coaching success than our head coach.

          • ChoTime

            Yeah, this is the dumbest -ism there is, I think. Not hiring 50-year olds isn’t the same thing as not hiring 30-year olds.

          • anon

            I think age-ism used to be more rational before the internet. How could you gain knowledge or access without having spent 30 years doing something, innovation too a ton of time so there weren’t a lot of “new approaches”. Now knowledge and access are at the fingertips of most tech-savvy people and innovation is occurring at a very fast pace. Now it’s more ability than age, i think.

          • Dave

            Technology-driven jobs are much different than non-tech jobs. A 20-something software engineer may have more knowledge in their field than a 40 or 50 something who has been in the software engineering field their whole working career, but failed to keep up on new technologies/methods. On the flip side, a 20 something bricklayer almost certainly will not have the same skill as a bricklayer with 20 years experience.

            Coaching is one of the few professions that each year, a full cycle of experience is gained. You have the offseason, preseason, regular season, and postseason. Each of these presents a different learning environment. And with each season, new scenarios and outcomes are learned.

          • anon

            Yeah but there’s coaches that still have outdated schemes and outdated mindsets. Lots of coaches gained lots of experience losing.

            That said i think being a good coordinator and a good coach are different things, probably takes a while to find out which one you are.

          • Dave

            To your point, Schwartz runs the same scheme year after year. He did not like Eric Rowe’s laid back personality had Howie trade him away. He was unwilling to waiver on his system or ideals. It’s the reason he probably won’t be a head coach again.

          • ChoTime

            There have been studies on experts, which show that in some fields, such as wine tasting and medicine, experts are often outperformed by people with much less experience. For example, MDs deteriorate as they get further away from medical school in some aspects of diagnosis (they forget what they learned). Oenophiles don’t have measurable advantages over normal people in identifying wines.

            Maybe coaching is one of these fields, in that it’s pretty hard to correlate results with experience. But then, NFL is such a damn complex thing, and there are so many moving parts.

          • John Galt

            Head Coach in the NFL is arguably trickier than CEO in other industries. You have to lead a group of people that make more money than you, probably are not on the same level as you intellectually to understand what you bring to the table (as opposed to other execs in a situation like with Zuckerberg) unless you played or have a long successful resume. Thinking that a 30 yr is likely to fail as an NFL head coach is not the same as saying a 30 yr cannot lead any other business.

          • Rellihcs

            Fair enough.

      • ChoTime

        “Do you think that that billion dollar organization’s financial success depends on the football success of the team?”

        I would argue that it does.

        A young coach is a shot in the dark, not a long-term plan. Just as likely, he’ll be out in two years. Get someone proven to be able to do the job, build the team into a contender. Worrying about the coach aging out in 5 years is a 2nd order problem. First worry about building something–anything.

        • Rellihcs

          So you don’t think that it’s true that some NFL franchises suffer for long periods of time – from a football success perspective – but still make a decent profit?

          • ChoTime

            You mean the profit they get from NFL welfare generated by Cowboys, Giants, and Patriots?

            I wouldn’t call that “success.” You don’t need a coach for that, you need an accountant.

          • Rellihcs

            See, I would call that success in the frame of financial success – what we were discussing was financial success – that’s measured in dollars.

            Whether the dollars come from a form of corporate welfare or not – dollars are dollars.

          • Bert’s Bells

            I wouldn’t call that “success” I’d call that “making money”. Those are two different things.

          • Rellihcs

            Well my initial use of the word “success” was immediately preceded by the word “financial”. So I specified a context. If you want to argue that the context of how money is made can alter the overall quality of the financial success, fine with me.

            – we are officially arguing semantics here.

          • Bert’s Bells

            I’m on a mission to cleave “success” from “wealth” in every context.

          • Rellihcs

            Aha – point taken and ardently agreed with.

          • anon

            Well they also had to move cities…

          • ChoTime

            Okay. I guess I can see how you could call being a bottom 10 franchise a success. Personally, when you are being gifted profitability due to a cartel system and really can only blow it by gross mismanagement, I would call success being, say, at least average within the scope of that system.

          • anon

            eagles

    • Tumtum

      The list doesn’t really compel me to think that the age gives him any more chance of failure than any other coach.

      When I was 24 I was running a business. I can’t count how many times I would meet a client in person after speaking to them on the phone and they would mention something about my age. Pretty annoying. More power to him. First millennial HC. Let’s see what my worthless generation has to offer.

      • Dave

        I think that’s awesome that you started your own business at 24. As a business owner myself, I have nothing but respect for anyone who has the balls to go out on their own, regardless of their age.

        However, you cannot compare age to experience.

        At 24 years old, I was out of college for a little over a year and doing entry-level work in my scientific field. The reason I wasn’t managing multi-million dollar projects at 24 was that I did not have enough experience. I had to learn all the facets of my field until I was ready.

        Does McVay have enough knowledge and experience to run an NFL football team? I don’t know. I do know that having 8 years experience in the NFL is not a lot. Pederson may have only had 7 years coaching in the NFL, but then again he was a player for over a decade.

        • Tumtum

          I can see the concern for sure. I just feel like age shouldn’t be a prerequisit.

          Either way I am rooting for the guy. In addition to being young he ditched the skins and snatched Wade phillips up before he could go there. He is already a sucessful head coach in my book!

          • Dave

            I do commend the Rams for their leap of faith, considering the last coach they hired was the antithesis of an up-and-comer.

          • Tumtum

            Seems like everyone in the NFL is always trying to make their everlasting mark. Completely reinvent the wheel every time there is a flat tire.

          • anon

            Young CEO smart enough to recognize good older tatent is a good start.

          • Tumtum

            Especially when it is old talent that the Redskins wanted! Wade’s son is currently the TE coach in D.C as well. Take him too Sean!!

          • anon

            Damn, picked LA over his own kid?

  • Dave
    • Anders

      He was also roasted in TC by the Eagles WRs and I mean if you cant look good against the likes of Reuben Randle or Miles Austin.

      • Dave

        He was a 23 year old with 5 career starts playing for a coach who disliked him, not exactly a recipe for success.

        At least we still have the 2017 Na Brown award winner, Jalen Mills, on the roster. As Na Brown taught us, training camp is the most important time to evaluate a player’s future success rate.

        • Mitchell

          Very good point Cool Sunglasses Dave. Was psyched when he was drafted, felt a bit empty when he was traded

        • sonofdman

          Whoa whoa whoa, future hall of famer Paul Turner was the run away Na Brown award winner this past year.

          Unless 2017 wasn’t a typo and you’re predicting that Mills will win the Na Brown award next season? πŸ™‚

          • Dave

            I don’t know. Turner was the preseason game darling while Mills was the training camp sensation. Plus, I’ve never seen Turner give an opponent the Mutumbo finger wag.

          • sonofdman

            I got the impression that the coaches were talking up Mills but the fans were overly excited about Turner. You are right about the finger wag though.

            Either way, I’m just having some fun and your original point was a good one.

    • scratcherk

      “good news” i guess is that this guarantees a 3rd round pick in return. And we spent a 2nd on him.. so theres that…. *kicks rock*

      • Mitchell

        *rocks in the corner going silently insane, wondering when the Eagles will have decent cornerbacks.*

    • Tumtum

      I could only read a few paragraphs. Blood pressure not worth finishing that.

      • Howie Littlefinger

        Long story short: he ran a 4.4 after his college coach looked at him and thought he would be slow

        • ChoTime

          Interesting, really? so much for the eye test…

    • Mac

      I can’t believe I wasted one of my five free page views on this crap.

  • BobSmith77

    https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2017/jan/12/san-diego-chargers-los-angeles-move-nfl-owners

    Good. So sick and tired of NFL (sports owners) overall shaking down the public for tens or hundreds of millions in public funding (in his case Spanos wanted $1B in public funding) to build stadiums which almost exclusively ends up in the owner’s pockets when the team is sold.

    As much as I like the Eagles if Lurie tries to shake down the city and state for a new stadium in the mid-2020s I hope the public votes the exact same way. Move to Mexico City or London or Vegas.

    I was really disappointed that the city wasn’t a lot tougher on the Eagles and Lurie in regards to their ridiculous rent increase to Temple Football which has caused Temple to go down the disastrous course of deciding to build their own boondoggle of a stadium.

    You would think the Temple University President and leadership would be a bit more self aware of the fiscal state of college football programs, what happened with Rutgers and building their own football stadium, and the GOP’s long-term outlook for funding higher education in PA. Corbett already tried to largely eviscerate it in 2011 and only was stopped by public backlash across party lines. If Wagner wins the GOP nod in 2018 (I wouldn’t bet against him), you’ll see what Corbett tried to do revisited in 2019.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/special-reports/college-football

    • Dave

      Joe Banner has made it very clear in the past year that the one thing he is most proud of is getting taxpayers to foot a large portion of the Eagles stadium.

      • BobSmith77

        Joe Banner is a generally a prick from what I have heard. I know he used to go into two higher end restaurants in Philly and was just a general a-hole to the staff and didn’t want people to talk to him or anyone he was with.

        Basically a ‘Master of the Universe’ complex for a guy who was anything but.

      • anon

        It’s great business, obviously. I think you can either have crazy high ticket fees or public funding of a stadium. But you can’t have people paying taxes to build your building and then still have 200 per seat for shitty seats. Not to mention that they want stadiums to turn over every 15-20 years now, which doesn’t make sense when your issuing 30yr bonds to pay for them.

        • Dave

          Next thing you know, these teams will tell the public that baseball and football teams can’t share a stadium and the public will have to fork over twice as much money so each owner can have their own stadium;-o

          • anon

            have you seen oakland?

            Owners are chasing $. GS has been in oakland for years, selling out games when they were good and bad, but as soon as they’re good they move to SF – why is that?

            SF is good, they get a new stadium where, silicon valley. Be interesting to see how that investment works out now that the team sucks.

    • Julescat

      the NFL owners have become carpetbaggers.

      Goodell is the worst commissioner in all of sports. The loss of interest in the NFL by America is not an accident.

  • Howie Littlefinger

    2) Alshon Jeffery, Chicago Bears (60.9 percent catch rate with less than 1 yard seperation)

    Jeffery posted 60.9 percent catch rate on targets (23) where he had less than a yard of separation. He averaged 21.1 yards per reception on those targets, and 14.9 air yards per target on the season. He’ll bring a dynamic downfield threat who can win contested catches to a new team should he leave Chicago.

    • P_P_K

      Jeffery comes with some baggage but I agree he’d be a good fit with the Eagles. I’d imagine he’s rather play with Carson than whatever character the Bears have under center at any given time.

  • Greg Richards

    Haven’t seen this here – Eagles want to interview Rams WRs coach/passing game coordinator Mike Groh for their WR coach vacancy. The Rams offense as a whole struggled but their receivers improved under Groh. Kenny Britt had a careery year. Coached the Bears’ WRs the 3 years prior to that.

    • anon

      Can’t tell what to think about him. He’s had some pretty good talent to work with over the years.

    • GermanEagle

      Jefereyzzzz

  • Tumtum

    Bill O’brian is gearing up to play a team where his 100 million dollar quarter back wouldn’t be welcome to hold a clip board for the league minimum, after winning a play off game, answering questions about being fired. What world is this?

    • Dave

      Either you have a franchise QB, or you mortgage your career trying to acquire one.

      Brock will collect his guaranteed $16M next year and then be cut. It was basically a 2 year, $37M deal.

      Unfortunately, I doubt Bob will outlast Brock.

      • Tumtum

        Just hard to imagine that Bill’s job would be in jeopardy.

  • SteveH

    I got Seattle over Atlanta, NE over Hou (obviously), KC over Pittsburgh, and GB over Dallas.

    NE over Hou, then GB over Seattle

    GB over NE in super bowl.

    • John Galt

      The Patriots cheat like crazy, but if Belichek figures out a way to play the Texans twice in a row that would top em all…

    • Sean Stott

      Nah, Atlanta will put up way too many points for SEA. I don’t see GB stopping DAL whatsoever.

      • P_P_K

        Rodgers bests Prescott.
        Green Bay 34
        Dallas 31

    • P_P_K

      Yes!

  • Dragon_Eagle

    McDermott hired Juan Castillo as O-line coach and run-game coordinator. I wonder if Pederson tried to hire Juan for some role on the offensive side of the ball.

    BTW. Falcons over Hawks, Pats over Texans, Steelers over Chiefs, and *choke* Girls over Pack.

    • Greg Richards

      Castillo’s contract was up so he was free to move where he wanted. Last year, BAL would have had to grant the Eagles permission to hire Castillo away from them.

    • Corry

      Looks like McDermott is trying to get the gang back together up there in Buffalo with Leslie Frazier coming on board as well.

  • Insomniac

    With the new head coaches and soon to be fired Chip Kelly, I think the chances of some guys could fall if the rebuilding teams want a QB.

    1. Cleveland Browns (can afford to wait till their next pick to get a QB if they need to)
    2. San Francisco 49ers (needs a new QB)
    3. Chicago Bears (needs a new QB)
    4. Jacksonville Jaguars (goes BPA)
    5. Tennessee Titans (goes BPA)
    6. New York Jets (needs a new QB)
    7. San Diego Chargers (BPA but could get a QB too)
    8. Carolina Panthers (BPA)
    9. Cincinnati Bengals (BPA)
    10. Buffalo Bills (needs a new QB)
    11. New Orleans Saints (BPA but could get a QB too)
    12. Cleveland Browns (whatever)
    13. Arizona Cardinals (BPA but could get a QB too)
    14. Indianapolis Colts (BPA)

    It would be great if this could be a 2011 repeat where the QB class was also weak and 4 QBs went in the top 15. FYI, 2011 was the year where Jake Locker, Christian Ponder and Blaine Gabbert were drafted.

    • Will Ft. Daft Punk

      Are the Jags stuck with Gabbert?

      • Insomniac

        You mean Bortles? Yea I think they like him.

        • Will Ft. Daft Punk

          Yes. That’s what I said… I think I saw Gabbert in you comment and accidentally wrote it again.

          But yeah I think 3 QBs could go before we pick. A RB and at least one OT, maybe 2.

          • Insomniac

            I’m not sure if an OT will go top 10, it’s a weak OL draft this year. A RB and WR might go top 10. I’m sure a DB will end up going top 10. If we win the coin toss for the 14th pick then we should have more options since the Colts need a ton of help on the defensive side and a RB.

          • Will Ft. Daft Punk

            Its a weak draft but QBs and OTs shoot up the the boards between now and the draft. The OTs from Alabama and Wisconsin both have first round grades, then there is a big drop off.

            I dont think its out of the question for one to be drafted in the top 14

          • Insomniac

            I think the teams who need an OT right now would trade down if they really wanted one. Off the top of my head, the Colts, Jaguars and Panthers are the only teams that need immediate OL help. Then you have the teams that need to groom an OT in the Browns, Bengals, and Cardinals. It could be possible but the chances are slim.

          • Will Ft. Daft Punk

            Id put my money on at least going before our pick. Has there ever been a draft where at least one OT didnt go top 15?

          • Insomniac

            Not in the last 16 years, one OT has always went top 15. After a brief look those one guys were usually picked close to the 15th spot.

          • Will Ft. Daft Punk

            We just need one to go before us. Doesn’t matter where. One or two guys will shoot up draft boards after combine workouts.

          • Insomniac

            I know but the thing is Cam Robinson has off the field issues. Ryan Ramzcyk had hip surgery recently. That’s why I said the chances are slim.

          • Will Ft. Daft Punk

            Think happy thoughts

          • Insomniac

            The Bengals always like talented idiots!

          • Will Ft. Daft Punk

            I’m holding onto any hope I can that one of Williams or Davis is there.

          • kajomo

            Garrett Bolles may go before both of those guys. He’s probably a top 20 pick in this draft.

          • Insomniac

            Maybe. His age is going to terrify some teams.

          • kajomo

            Teams a desperate for OL help.

            Plus remember Danny Watkins…oh wait. Bad example

    • kajomo

      Since 2011 teams have been wiser. I’m not going to look up the years, but there was the draft where EJ manuel was the only 1st round QB and Geno Smith fell to the 2nd. Derek Carr and Bridgewater went later in the first. Teams didn’t reach.

      I think the days of teams just grabbing QBs at the top of the draft because they need one are over. Carr, Dak, R Wilson are proving you can be more patient. Elite prospects (or close) go early. Everyone else kinda falls in line.

      • laeagle

        I agree; I think that draft was the last one where people completely overreached on QBs.

      • Insomniac

        True but the same lesson can have different results for some teams. There’s also going to be competition for a QB so who knows what really will happen. After all, I believe most new regimes will want their own QB if he’s not in place yet.

        Carr went in the second and he would easily be the first pick now. I think teams had to reconsider their talent evaluation after Carr, Prescott, and Wilson. Not so much for Bridgewater since teams probably knew what he was already.

  • Nick C

    Reuben Foster, Corey Davis, Mike Williams, Dalvin Cook, “Teez” Tabor– hoping one should be there and some QBs get pushed up the board.

    If not, moving back for Sidney Jones or McCaffery is my pick.